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Affordability Matters Blog

Red tape. Aggressive agendas. Bureaucracy. Get the latest news about what's threatening your access to affordable electricity.

Proposed EPA Rule: All Pain, No Gain?

When it comes to the EPA’s proposed rule on existing power generation, everyone seems to have an opinion. The proposed change to Section 111d of the Clean Air Act is known as the Clean Energy Plan, with much of the EPA’s rhetoric speaking very positively about the propose rule and how the benefits to society far outweigh any negative aspects of implementation. Many do not share the EPA’s perspective on the Clean Energy Plan.

Despite threats, electricity remains good value

Keep Electricity Affordable periodically highlights unwise potential government mandates that could raise the price of electricity – and how rate hikes could hurt families, schools, farms and other small businesses. 

But it’s worth remembering that – as our name makes clear – electricity remains relatively affordable considering all it does to enhance our lives. (So let’s keep working together to make sure it stays that way!)

Nobody likes an increase in the electricity bill but this graphic provides some perspective:

New mandates have real consequences on electricity prices

You may be familiar with the drill: First, government regulators announce new mandates on power production. Then proponents and critics of the new rules debate the potential impact on how much consumers pay for electricity – often coming to very different conclusions.

It may be hard to decide who to believe.

But there’s much less room for debate when we can see the impacts on electricity bills that consumers are receiving today.

Hearings across nation spark debate on EPA regulations

The debate over the future of U.S. electricity generation was on full display this week at Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) hearings in Atlanta, Denver, Pittsburgh and Washington, D.C.. The focus of these public hearings? The EPA’s proposed Clean Power Plan that could radically alter the way electricity is generated by utilities and used and paid for by consumers nationwide.

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