Subscribe to RSS - blogs

Blogs

Affordability Matters Blog

Red tape. Aggressive agendas. Bureaucracy. Get the latest news about what's threatening your access to affordable electricity.

Colorado: Potential bill would put a new burden on still-struggling families

Colorado’s economy hit a rough patch, but we got through it. And now we’re moving forward again. But our economy can’t afford to take any more hits.

While the Colorado legislative session marked is half-way point last week, we aren’t quite ready to breathe a sigh of relief. We know that there are groups with extreme agendas who may still want to place expensive mandates on customers in rural Colorado.

Let There Be Light!

New research out of the University of Colorado and University of Denver is using nighttime satellite images of the earth to estimate the magnitude of poverty. Researchers have created an index based on the correlation between the amount of electric light that’s visible at night in a particular region and its population.

Investing in Tomorrow

By Keven J. Groenewold

Consumers are adding more plugged-in devices daily, and are paying more for their convenience. The average annual residential electric bill has soared $263 since 2005, with electricity use outpacing efficiency efforts. Despite the rescent recession, U.S. homes on average used an additional 50 kilowatt-hours (kWh) every month between 2009 and 2010; retail electricity sales rose 4.4 percent.

Take Action: Sign our letter to President Obama

As President Obama sets his second-term agenda, join us in sending a clear message about the importance of affordable electricity to the economy. 

As you and approximately 60,000 other supporters of Keep Electricity Affordable know, the cost of electricity impacts the budget of every home, farm, school and small business. While our national and local economies struggle to recover from the downturn, we don’t need misguided public policies unnecessarily driving up the price of power.

Super Bowl blackout shows how we take electricity for granted

The Super Bowl blackout almost stymied the Baltimore Ravens’ game plan but it could give a push to the nation’s discussion of energy issues.
 
That’s the view of U.S. Sen.  Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, who said the 33 minutes when the Superdome went dark could shed light on how much we all rely on electricity. 
 
“I think it helps to perhaps kick-start the debate,” she said, according to The Hill newspaper.

Pages